New Start in Japan

We came back to Japan! Yay!

 

Since we finished our travel, we have been looking for a place to settle down. However it is more likely to be Japan where we are going to live for good. My body tells me not to go anywhere far. Everywhere I went, my body tried to adjust to the climate and food, but living in a place where I grew up and eating what I am accustomed to, like miso, brown rice, fish and vegetable, is doing the best to energize the body. :p

 

Stuff that I have done since I came back to Japan can be a long list. I did update my drivers license, went to a dentist and a doctor, organized my cloths, room and everything, and saw relatives. More over, I have been eating Japanese food almost everyday!!! I was so happy to make it just before October, the season of pacific saury, the fish. After the saury, I was able to pick up tons of persimmon from my yard and lots of kinds of vegetables from the garden. The season of apple is just about to come now. During the two months of stay in Japan, the weather and seasonal food around me have changed so much.

 

Soon after coming back to Japan, we went to a lantern festival at Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, where I have relatives on my mother’s side. Nihonmatsu is a place where my ancestor had lived for many many years, and I still come here for visiting the graves. When I come here, there are two things I always shop. Red bean sweets called “yokan” at Tamashima-ya and rice cake at Hinatsu. My great grand mother did the same thing, so why not I do the same. 🙂

DSC_1330

I don’t know if you can recognize the signboard of Nihonmatsu Yokan, “二本松羊羹” and Hinatsu, “日夏” from the photo. haha

 

DSC_1352

These are the rice cakes from Hinatsu. The sauce are sweet and made of beans(photo above) and soy sauce(photo below). Yum.

DSC_1354

 

DSC_1341

The ruins of castle in Nihonmatsu.

 

DSC_1342

My mother said my great grand mother had lived near the stone monument. So we walked to the house where my great grand mother had lived and now another distant relative lives to feel how close it is from the castle and the stone monument to the house. It seemed no one was home when we got near the house. My mom said “I think no one is home”, then turned around. I am sure she was not going to visit the house even if the house owner who was home.

 

DSC_0471

There are seven groups for the local people to form and walk with the lanterns. The groups are formed according to where they live.

 

DSC_0034 (1)

 

DSC_1361 (1)
Do you see the shape of “3” on the head of a guy?
 

DSC_0044

He stands out, doesn’t he?
 

DSC_0076

They still use candles for the lanterns.
 

DSC_0180

Do you see the two letter of “郭内”(kakunai) on the lantern? Where my great grand mother lived would join to Kakunai.

 
DSC_0332

They are looking at young boys who are playing musical instruments. Sorry, you cannot see them from this angle.
 
DSC_0459
 
DSC_1163

This is a dinner table at my grand mother’s house. My mother’s younger sister made the wonderful dishes. They are both local food of Fukushima area and eaten at formal situation like a new year. The photo above shows “Ika ninjin”, squid and carrots, and the photo below shows “Kozuyu”, there is no meaning that I know for kozuyu. In Aizu area in Fukushima, they use scallop for the broth but in other area of inner Fukushima like Nihonmatsu, they skip the scallop often. This is because in Aizu and Nihonmatsu have different paths in their development. They are both far from coastal coast, so they needed some one to carry the fish all the way when there was no auto-mobile car or good road. Aizu was a bigger a market to sell fish for the distributer, therefore had an access to the fish, on the other hand, Nihonmatsu was smaller and didn’t have an access to the fish.
 
DSC_1217

 

Anyway, I came back to Japan safely and slowly going to write about the travel!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: